Resume

Elena Marella 

 

RELEVANT SKILLS

 

Computer: Proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Raiser’s Edge

Research and writing: Applied in writing research papers & grants

Archaeological: Experience working with delicate and priceless artifacts

Communication: Demonstrated ability to communicate ideas effectively in a team in a professional work environment

 

Experience

 

De Young Museum

Education Internship for Monday School Programs                       Feb 2011 – June 2011

Greeted visiting schools and led school groups through program components

Managed in-gallery groups

Assisted the museum artists with the hands-on art project

Collaborated with fellow interns and museum staff to develop curriculum for Olmec Mondays

Taught students about archaeological process

 

Archaeological Collections Assistant

NAGPRA Laboratory SFSU                                                          September – June 2010

Catalogued historic and pre-historic period artifacts

Entered artifact data into database

Scanned and digitized historical photos and documents

Handled culturally sensitive materials

Acted as liaison between NAGPRA Coordinator and Anthropology Department

 

Field Archaeologist

Tepetate Archaeological Project      

Granada, Nicaragua                                                                                      Summer 2008

Surveyed and excavated site

Processed and catalogued pre-Columbian artifacts

Worked in conjunction with Mi Museo, a local museum

Raised awareness of local community’s cultural heritage

Worked on educational materials intended for public consumption

 

EDUCATION

 

Anthropology BA   Concentration: Cultural 

San Francisco State University 2013

      President: Anthropology Club

Dean’s List

Community Service Learning Award 2009

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Cover Letter

Dear Hiring Manager,

 

I am applying for the position of on-call archaeological field technician advertised on Shovelbums.org’s jobs board.  I believe I am an excellent candidate for this position because I have a love of archaeology and an eagerness to preserve our past.  I have field experience working in Nicaragua, and while I do not have 6 months of experience in the field working in California, I have 10 months of lab experience working on different sites throughout the Bay Area.  I am hard working, detail oriented, and not afraid to get my hands dirty.  I hope you will consider my application, and I look forward to the next phase in the hiring process.

 

Sincerely,

 

Elena Marella

Critical Synthesis

 

The three articles chosen all agreed that an the ethnographer’s goal is to gain information for the ethnography by means of participant observation, which means the ethnographer must go into the field and become accepted by the cultural group in order to understand how the culture operates.  The Wang article, “Writing Live Fieldnotes: Towards a More Open Ethnography,” hints at this challenge while explaining her difficulties in choosing a medium for recording her notes; “Does a black moleskin look too nice for my fieldsite?… Does my notebook allow me to fit in with teens?”  The article from the Appalachian State University library site is especially clear on what ethnography is.  Each article also agrees that while interpreting the experiences from the field is important, the main focus should be how to translate these findings to the reader.  The Blowers article, from the Bethel College website, asserts that the failure to translate meaningful cultural features from its informants to its audience is a common pitfall in much ethnography written today.  This hearkens back to the Wang article where she talks about live fieldnoting, the practice of using social media to share notes with a wide audience.  She describes the value of live fieldnoting as being translative by nature “I can bring [my readers] into my fieldsite virtually and have them participate by proxy, thus making them feel like I am bringing them with me instead of showing them an end product.”  The articles are written for people who are already writing, or plan to someday write ethnographies so they can have a clear understanding of how to do so.